MAY 2004
EDITORIAL
MARTIN'S MUSINGS
D-DAY SERMON
BEATING THE BOUNDS
CHURCH NEWS
FRIENDS OF THE CHURCH
CALIFORNIA LETTER
R.B.L. WOMEN
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
NEW ZEALAND CHILD
COUNTRY MATTERS
GARDEN IN MAY
THE OLD HOUSE
DUMONT LUNCHEON CLUB
W.R.V.S OVER 60'S
BANK HOLIDAYS
MEDIEVAL TIMES
CHURCH CRAWLING
500 YRS AGO
FESTIVAL WEEK
BIKE TO LONDON
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY
FRIENDS CAN WEIGHT
ACTIVE 4 LIFE - RELAX
+ DIARY DATES +
LOW TIDE DAY
THE ITALIAN WAY
TENDRING NEWS & NOTES
PARISH COUNCIL REPORT
ST OSYTH AS A CHILD
SCHOOL NEWS
THE WAR IN ST OSYTH
ST OSYTH BEFORE D-DAY
PRE SCHOOL PLAYGROUP
ST OSYTH IN BLOOM
ST OSYTH CRICKET CLUB
LOCUST PLAGUE
FUNDRAISER TRIPS
ST OSYTH W.I.
HOME PAGE
HEALTH CARE
VANDALISM COWLEY PK.
WITHOUT WARNING
DISABLED CLUB
MOBILE LIBRARY
TAE KWON DO CHAMP!
P.C. PLAYGROUND
ED'S LETTERS & STAMPS

 


THE OLD HOUSE


This is the attractive pink house in Spring Road, at the beginning of Chapel Lane.
The construction dates from 1300 AD to the late 15th century. 
Officially a Grade II listed building it is timber framed and plastered.  It is thought to have been the Maltings for the Priory, the house occupied by the Master Maltster and the actual Maltings were roughly where the Methodist Church and Scout Hut stands today.  Spring Road was then called Pond Street.

Features of importance are one of the earliest brick-lined cellars in Essex, a deep well with grating and indications of a tunnel to the Priory.

There is also a Priest’s bolt hole on the first floor, with access from the loft, yet perfectly concealed, dating from early the 16th century.
In the 18th century the house was occupied by George Gildersleeves who owned the Quay and barges, a rich merchant. 

Then by successive generations the name was shortened to Gilders.  The small daughter of one of them met with an unfortunate fate, she had her eyes pecked out by a cockerel and was blind.

At some point in the 19th century the house was occupied by the Gibson family; they were strong Wesleyan supporters.  During their tenure the Maltings buildings were replaced by the Wesleyan chapel, schoolroom and churchroom.  The chapel was completed in 1855 and Sunday School treats were held in the Gibsons’ garden.  The land each side was to the north Beckey’s land and to the south Butcher’s smallholding, the packing sheds were where the entrance to Brookvale is now.

The house then became home to the newly married Mabel Cowley, heiress to the Priory.  It was from there that she provided school meals during the First World War.  When her husband was put in charge of the Bodleian Library in Oxford they vacated the old house around 1920.

For a short period, after the house was sold from the Priory Estate, it was sub-divided as Priory Cottage and to the right Little Priory Cottage.  The main house became the Kingsford Tea Rooms for a few years.

By the start of the Second World War the house was owned by the Maslin family and Little Priory Cottage by Mr Brown, the austere Parish Clerk.

In the late decades of the 20th century part of the garden to the right was sold and the house called Marlowes was built.

Phyll Hendy, History Recorder



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