HISTORICAL SOCIETY
VISIT LINDEN HSE IN EYE
VISIT TO WEST STOW HALL
WW1 EXHIBITION 2014
COLUMBINE HALL VISIT
GARDEN PARTY 2012
BEDFIELD HALL VISIT
KIRSTEAD HALL, NORWICH
FRINTON STATION HOUSE
BOURNE MILL VISIT
CHRISTMAS MEETING 2009
PROGRAMME 2009-10
VISIT COGGESHALL ABBEY
QUIZ NIGHT 2008
2007 GET TOGETHER
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2006
DEENE PARK VISIT
WAR EXHIBITION 2005
VISIT MELFORD HALL
VISIT PAYCOCKES HOUSE
VISIT TO LAVENHAM
EXHIBITION 2004
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2003
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2001
VISIT TO WISBECH
VILLAGE WALKS
PRIORY EXHIBITION -01
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2000
COFFEE MORNING


THE DECEMBER MEETING 2009



Looking over Mr Grace's shoulder to where (extreme right) our Chairman Sean O'Dell
standing, is thanking him for the evening's talk in taking us back to a much harsher period of time for the working population of Ipswich.


The last meeting of the Society in 2009 was on a subject entitled the ‘History of the Working Class Communities in 19th Century Ipswich’. It was delivered to us by Mr Frank Grace who spoke about the appalling living conditions in the acres of slum properties in the area known as the ‘Rope Walk’ and ‘Cox Lane’ with its crushing poverty and unemployment, particularly of women. During the century Ipswich grew from just over 11,000 at the beginning of the eighteen hundreds, to a population of over 66,600 by 1901. In 1842 new wet docks were created which increased the trade passing through the port with coal and iron arriving from around the country to feed the new manufacturing units, whose products were taken first by barge, then later by rail, when in the middle of the Century the railway arrived in Ipswich. This firmly linked the area with many others and in particular with London, without the need for barge transport on local waterways.

In the same time period he said, Ipswich became a manufacturing centre adding to the shipbuilding already there, with brick and cement making, brewing, milling of linseed to produce oil and the beginning of a printing and clothing industry. The business of ‘Ransome's of Ipswich’ grew from the iron foundries specialising in railway iron work and farm machinery that began at that time and today is a trade name known everywhere for its machinery, particularly grass cutting mowing machines.
Mr Grace gave us a great deal of information, a note of which is the text above.

The evening had also been allocated for a small Christmas celebration between members and guests, our Chairman Sean O’Dell thanked Mr Grace for his presentation and invited members to partake of a drink and snack.



Members brought with them various goodies which they shared with other members who had provided other buffet items.



All the usual drinks were available. I mean tea, coffee, orange juice & mineral water
Oh! I nearly forgot some very nice wines



Eating on the move was the order of the day, but if you
could find a table then so much the better!

The Society has had a series of very good talks during the year and it is sometimes quite surprising how what we are being told about other places in Essex, fit well with the history of St Osyth, or Chick as our village was formerly known.

18/12/09
M.J.T.


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