HISTORICAL SOCIETY
VISIT LINDEN HSE IN EYE
VISIT TO WEST STOW HALL
WW1 EXHIBITION 2014
COLUMBINE HALL VISIT
GARDEN PARTY 2012
BEDFIELD HALL VISIT
KIRSTEAD HALL, NORWICH
FRINTON STATION HOUSE
BOURNE MILL VISIT
CHRISTMAS MEETING 2009
PROGRAMME 2009-10
VISIT COGGESHALL ABBEY
QUIZ NIGHT 2008
2007 GET TOGETHER
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2006
DEENE PARK VISIT
WAR EXHIBITION 2005
VISIT MELFORD HALL
VISIT PAYCOCKES HOUSE
VISIT TO LAVENHAM
EXHIBITION 2004
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2003
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2001
VISIT TO WISBECH
VILLAGE WALKS
PRIORY EXHIBITION -01
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2000
COFFEE MORNING

BOURNE MILL COLCHESTER
SOCIETY VISIT



View of the Mill across its water. The sign is copied from the gateway

On the 8th July 2010 a party from St Osyth arrived at Bourne Mill where they were received by David Piper, the National Trust Warden for this area of England. He spoke of the history of the Mill, saying that BOURNE MILL belongs to the National Trust, who acquired the property in 1936. The building is Grade 1 listed and is late Elizabethan, originally built for Sir Thomas Lucas as a rich manís fishing lodge in 1591, where he would hold events and banquets for his guests. Eventually it was converted into a water driven mill using a five acre mill pond. At first it became a fulling mill, and then later it became a grain mill to receive and mill grain from the locality. (Fulling is a step in woollen cloth making which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to eliminate oils, dirt, and other impurities, and thereby making it thicker. The worker who does the job is a fuller Ė Wikipedia)

The Mill is situated in Bourne Road, Colchester, where inside one finds some of the original machinery in place including the 18 foot diameter waterwheel, which last year had major repairs carried out, because wood rot around the mechanism made the huge wheel wobble, but happily the wheel is now restored and working once again. It should be said that there is a continuous programme of restoration work at the mill conducted by the National Trust.



The flank wall of the Mill from the entrance



The family crest of the Sir Thomas Lucas



The Historical Society's visiting party ready to be addressed by David Piper the
National Trust Warden who explains the many significant features of the building,
whilst guiding visitors around the Mill.



The 'main' source of power with the large crown
wheel driven directly from the waterwheel.

The power source of a mill is water and to the left can be seen the very large crown wheel that is driven directly by the water wheel, which in turn through a Pinion, changes the power by a right angle to drive the upright shaft that runs through the building, as the universal source of power for all the millís activities.



A model of some of the inner workings of
the Mill. Turn the handle to see it work!



Another impressive working model showing
one of the areas where grain was treated

The building is a mixture of construction materials such as limestone from St John's Abbey, a Benedictine monastery founded in 1096; Roman brick and even solidified mud said to have come from the cliff at Walton. The construction includes stepped "Dutch" gables which can be seen in the flank picture (top left above)

Today the Mill is open to visitors and is also used as a venue for talks on historical subject where its age suitably injects its own sense of history.



The party at the front of the mill where work done to restore the mill can easily be seen.



David Piper (right) drawing attention to the
hoist arrangements at the front of the Mill

M.J.T.
3/8/10


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