RECENT EVENTS
TWO VILLAGERS HONOURED
VILLAGE APPRAISAL 2010
FLYING FORTRESS CRASH
DAY AFTER THE SNOW
ACTIVE FOR LIFE CLUB
FROM PRIORY TOWER
TREES AT MARTINS FARM
SMACKS & BARGES 01
ST. OSYTH IN BLOOM
HORTICULTURAL SHOW
OUR NEW VICAR
VILLAGE OPEN GARDENS
HISTORICAL SOCY. PARTY
ARMISTICE DAY
VILLAGE CLEAN UP
THE FLOWER FESTIVAL
BARGE MATCH


FLYING FORTRESS CRASH


Sid Bruce a life long village resident, contacted the Web site to pose a question, which I have printed underneath a picture of a Flying Fortress aircraft. I wonder if somewhere in the world there is a former aircraft man who remembers and perhaps was involved in the incident Sid reports?
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On Saturday 25th April 1945, on army leave and in the village, I watched a flying fortress circle the village to eventually crash onto the field between the sandworks (now Shangrila) and Lamb Farm, bursting into flames with bullets going everywhere.

Apart from the pilot who injured his ankle, all of the crew parachuted to safety over the area, but what perhaps, was not realised at the time, was that only another half a mile flown and this aircraft would have crashed into the centre of the village!



An America Flying Fortress.


Would it be possible to find if any of the crew are alive so that the Village of St Osyth could express their gratitude to those brave men?
Yours Syd Bruce


Below is printed a letter received from a visitor to the village!
Dear St Osyth Parish representative
 
I have been alerted to the interest (from Syd Bruce) in the Flying Fortress which crashed near the St Osyth by-pass in April 1945 and I thought you might like to add an "eyewitness account of the incident". I was just 11 years old at the time staying on holiday with my aunt and uncle (Edna & Norman White) at Arundel, St Clairs Rd, St Osyth (the house now occupied by my cousin Wendy and her husband Nick). I wrote to my mother the day after the incident as follows:
"On Saturday a very exciting thing happened, a flying fortress with American's in it, had been over Holland and had been hit and had come back to the nearest place and that was St Osyth and it had dropped its parachutists and at first I thought that the plane was making vapour trails and that the parachutists were "worlds" and I was playing with Peter in his garden. Wendy was with us and Wendy wanted to go home so we were taking her home and we met Auntie Edna and she said the plane was on fire and then I saw the flames in the cockpit and it was circling  over St Clairs Rd for a bit and then it went over and when the pilot saw the plane would not land on anything he jumped out and he landed just by the by-pass and I ran down the road and found the parachutist had gone but the parachute was still there and it is lovely stuff, and there were ladies saying what a lovely blouse it would make;what a lovely skirt it would make said another and I heard that everybody in the plane was safe."
 
Note: I have corrected some of the spelling but have not altered the lengthy sentences because it gives the sense of breathless excitement that I obviosly felt as an 11-year old schoolboy!
The only oddity is that my letter is dated 15th April (1945) and Syd Bruce says that the crash was on the "Saturday, 25th April" (the Saturdays in April 1945 were in fact 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th so I think the correct date is 14th April 1945) In all other respects I echo Syd Bruce's sentiments and interest, although he might like to note that at the time it was immediately recognised that the pilot had taken great care to avoid the village.
 
You might like to add this to the web page?
David Buck.

20th December 2006.



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