MUSEUM
MUSEUM OPEN FOR 2016
MUSEUM OPEN DAY 14
OPEN DAY AUGUST 2013
ACTIVITY OUTSIDE 2011
LOOK INSIDE 2011
25 YEARS CELEBRATION
MUSEUM OPEN DAY 09
MUSEUM 08-OPEN DAY
KING GEORGE III CANNON
CELEBRATIONS
U.S. AIR FORCE VISIT

25 YEARS AS A MUSEUM



Our Aircraft Museum Open Day this year on 15th August 2010 coincided with the 65th anniversary of the end of the World War II, with the surrender of Japan on August 15th 1945, known in the UK as Victory in Japan or V.J. Day. The actual surrender documents were signed on board the USS Missouri on September 2nd 1945, but in Britain we use the 15th August to commemorate the day.

This year because of the anniversary, the Napoleonic re-enactment troop fired their cannon at 11 a.m. to signal a two minutes silence for the visitors present, to remember those who have died in the service of their country, not only in the two world wars but in conflicts since including latterly Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan.

The day may not have had sunshine, but it stayed dry if overcast. The Museum volunteers were all on station, dressed appropriate to their service, but a notable absentee was Albert Scott the East Essex Aviation Society Chairman who was on sick leave!
A Scottish pipe band was a new and colourful attraction this year and their music and marching was very well received by the audience.



The day also celebrated the 25th anniversary of the use of Martello Tower ‘A’ as an Aircraft Museum by the Society when a small group of enthusiasts got together under the leadership of Bill Gadd and put their knowledge together to set up a museum of aircraft artifacts.
Over the period of time the museum has evolved not just for aircraft and the air force, but many features of other services including war time civilian contributions and even first world war spent armament recovered from Flanders fields.



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The Napoleonic re-enactment soldiers demonstrating a field cannon in operation. Their leader explained each action as it took place in slow motion until the actual firing.



Well – you were warned. The leader had told the public to expect a very loud bang and advised the best way to diminish the effect on your eardrums – but it did not stop you jumping a few inches in the air!



The Troops Leader



Period music during



the discharging of rifles.



A Field Kitchen with utensils displayed.



A mock up Bren gun emplacement.



P51 Mustang fighter recovered from the sea off Clacton.



Glen Miller music to bring back memories of the war years.



Don’t shoot madam, I surrender.



Hand weapons, verbal explanation given.



Our civilian Naffi girl will serve you. How could we mange without them.



Through the gun sight. Swiss army close rangeanti aircraft weapon .



Riflemen discharge their weapons with the area between them and the Sea Wall cleared to avoid any possible injury to a visitor.
Traditionally each gun would first be loaded with black powder, the shot put down the barrel either wrapped in cloth or a separate tamping plug inserted and rammed home, the flash pan is then primed with fine powder ready to catch the spark and fire the gun. This latter action produced the expression ‘A flash in the pan’. meaning going off quickly. Another expression associated with Flintlocks refers to the fact that when a gun was primed the flint could be raised or ‘cocked’ to a safe position, only half way above the covered pan, ready to uncover the pan and fully cock the flint when ordered to fire, hence the expression ‘Going off at half cock’, meaning ineffective. Our riflemen however were very efficient and effective on Sunday when they fired their arms many times.



A group of re-enactment troops giving us their day for our pleasure.



Various rifles displayed that have been used in battle and now for sale.



Rifle bayonets and army knives .



Petrol driven field grinder for oats and corn.



1800Kg & 50Kg models of German bombs (One 16th scale). Compare for scale with the Incendary bomb front right, the size of half a pencil!



30,000 of these British Sea Mines were sown all down our East Coast in a belt 15 miles wide, with about 10 or 11 mines to the square mile.



“Help for Heroes” stall fund raising effort.



Helmets and military clothing on sale.



Bullets and insignia from the Swiss Army.



A tent display of Swiss arms and uniform.



M.J.T.
16/8/10.


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